Expectant Parents FAQ

Below, you will find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions expectant parents have regarding adoption. If you still have questions that were not answered or would like to get more information, please Contact Us.

A: No. Caring for Kids has worked with moms who have contacted us when they’ve first found out they’re pregnant, during the pregnancy, from the hospital after they’ve delivered, and even a few months or years after delivery. If you’re considering adoption for your child, every situation is different and there is never a wrong time to reach out and get more information.

A: There is no cost to a birth parent(s) who chooses to make an adoption plan. All costs associated with adoption are covered by the adoptive family, including prenatal and delivery medical expenses. Counseling, agency, and attorney fees are all covered by the adoptive family as part of their total adoption cost. Adoptive families are informed of this when they begin pursuing adoption.

A: There is financial assistance available. Ohio law allows assistance for pregnancy related living expenses. Such expenses may include help with groceries, gas, clothing, rent, and utilities. Living expenses must be distributed by the adoption agency or the attorney arranging the adoption.

A: Yes, ultimately you make the final decision on who is involved and aware of your pregnancy and adoption plan.  We will follow your lead and only discuss the adoption plan with those you approve of. Your wishes to keep information confidential are honored by the professionals working to support you.

A: Although Caring for Kids encourages minors to inform and involve their parents, if you and/or the birth father are under the age of 18 you do not need permission from your parents to create an adoption plan. Birth grandparents do not have parenting rights in Ohio. Regardless of age, in the state of Ohio, birth parents are considered legally capable of making independent decisions concerning their child.

A: No. Our goal is not to convince you to make an adoption plan, but to educate you about your options so you can feel confident making an informed decision for your baby. 

A: You can change your mind at any point while creating an adoption plan, before or after birth, as long as nothing permanent has been signed. After the baby is born, legally you must wait at least 72 hours to sign these permanent legal documents.  Additional time is always available if you need more time to make your decision.

A: It is not too late to make your adoption plan, even if you’ve already delivered. You can call or text us 24/7 at 330-815-4907. We have Birth Parent Counselors around the state who are willing and able to talk with you and meet with you, usually the same day!
It also is not uncommon for us to work with parents considering adoption for a child they’ve been parenting. We have placed children ages newborn up to six years old through our program and are readily available to talk about options for your individual situation!

A: At least 72 hours after the birth of the baby, you can choose to sign your permanent paperwork with Caring for Kids. Once signed, this paperwork is irrevocable and your adoption plan is permanent. You not have to go to court to complete this paperworkwe will meet with you wherever you are comfortable – the hospital, your home, our office, or another neutral location.

Questions about Birth Fathers

A:  Unless you are married to the birth father or he is involved in the military, you do not have to include him in your adoption planning. Fathers that wish to be involved are welcomed, and fathers that prefer not to be involved are respected. If your child’s biological father is not supporting you emotionally or financially, you can proceed with an adoption without him being involved.  Our agency professionals work with you based on your unique situation to help discern what level of involvement is potentially needed. All education and conversations around this issue are due to a desire to ensure the adoption plan you create is as secure as possible.

A: A birth father can prevent a birth mother from creating an adoption plan. In order for this to occur, he must be able to prove paternity, and take the appropriate legal action to oppose the adoption. A birth father does not have to give consent for a birth mother to choose adoption, unless they are married or he has taken appropriate legal action to establish paternity. An adoption can take place with only the relinquishment of a birth mother’s parental rights. A birth father can choose to not be involved with the plan, but also not oppose it.

A: Birth fathers can have rights in Ohio. The extent of these rights depends on each unique situation. When we have the opportunity to talk, we review the specifics of the circumstances and share appropriate information.

 

Ohio has a Putative Father Registry. The OPFR allows a male to register if he believes he may have fathered a child and wants to be notified if the child is placed for adoption. For more details on the Putative Father Registry for Ohio, visit https://jfs.ohio.gov/pfr/.

A: No, birth grandparents do not have parental rights in the state of Ohio. The only individuals that must give consent to the adoption are the birth mother and, if involved, the birth father. This stands true even if one, or both, of the expectant parents is a minor. Regardless of age, in the state of Ohio, expectant parents are considered adults and are thus legally capable of making decisions concerning their child.

A: 

1) If both potential fathers are actively involved with the birth mother during her pregnancy, then both alleged fathers could sign a surrender of parental rights. A DNA test can be done if requested.

2) If neither potential father is involved or supportive, then the adoption can take place without a father’s involvement.

3) If only one potential father is willing to be involved and supportive of the adoption plan, then he can consent to the adoption and surrender his rights as the birth father. This can be done with or without doing a DNA test.

4) If one of two fathers is involved but not supportive of the adoption plan, then a DNA test will be done prior to the placement to determine who is the biological father. If the alleged father that is opposed to the plan is determined to be the biological father, the adoption agency will not proceed with the adoption plan.

Questions about Adoptive Families

A: We talk in depth with you to see what you desire in an adoptive family. These values and wishes are then matched to adoptive families that our agency has already approved. Each adoptive family has created a profile book about their family to share with you and a letter to give more information and details about themselves. After reviewing the books & letters, you can choose to meet with the prospective adoptive families, set up a phone or video interview, or simply choose from looking through the books. If you would prefer to not be involved with the selection process, we can take the responsibility of choosing.

 

A: All adoptive families are put through a very rigorous homestudy screening process before being able to adopt through the agency. Prospective adoptive parents have had criminal background checks, medical exams, and screenings for a history of child abuse and neglect. They also have their financial situation evaluated and letters of reference written from family, friends and employers. Families are visited in their home and extensively interviewed about their personal and family history, desires to adopt, their support system, and much more. The homestudy is then approved and submitted to the state for approval before any children are placed in the home.

A: You decide what level of contact to have as you select an adoptive family. You are encouraged to meet or speak with the potential adoptive family, but are in no way obligated or forced to meet them. Your wishes will be respected! Many that have chosen not to meet the adoptive parents right away have changed their mind. This is your plan and you have the right to adjust decisions as things
progress.

View profiles of our Waiting Adoptive Families!

Questions about Ongoing Contact

A: Yes, if you are interested in seeing your child or knowing about them as they grow up, you are hoping for what we call an open adoption. Openness in adoption is considered to be a continuum.  You can choose to see the child for visits or simply exchange information with the adoptive family before the birth. Anything in between these two ends of the spectrum can also be considered.  Ultimately, you decide if you want an open adoption, and we seek waiting families that desire that same level of openness.

 

There is also the option of a closed adoption. This means that no identifying information is exchanged between the birth and adoptive families before or after the birth of the child. Generally in a closed adoption, there are no visits or exchanging of information throughout the child’s life.

 

A: Adoptive parents that have attended training through CFK are educated on the importance of sharing the child’s adoption story from the beginning. Our agency strives to portray the emotional benefits of openly discussing adoption with the adoptee. Having said this, the adoptive parents can only tell the adoptee what they know. If a birth parent chooses to meet with the adoptive family, they then get to know each other. This allows for a greater exchange of information with the child later in life. If an open adoption is maintained, the child could grow up knowing both their adoptive and birth parents.  In the case of a closed adoption, the adoptive family is given as much information as possible from the agency. Typically, adoptive families do a wonderful job focusing on the positive and portraying birth parents in a positive light. Their gratitude and love for you as their child’s birth parent is a motivating factor for this.

A: In the state of Ohio, an openness agreement between birth and adoptive families is not legally binding. It is possible that the level of openness that is agreed upon by you and the adoptive family will not be maintained by one or both parties. Adoptive families are given an abundance of information on the benefits of an open adoption and, in our experience, do maintain the agreed upon level of openness.  In the event that an adoptive family does not continue with the agreed upon level of openness, our agency offers to become involved and attempt to work out the situation.

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Expectant Parents FAQ

Below, you will find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions expectant parents have regarding adoption. If you still have questions that were not answered or would like to get more information, please Contact Us.

A: No. Caring for Kids has worked with moms who have contacted us when they’ve first found out they’re pregnant, from the hospital after they’ve delivered, and even a few months or years after delivery. If you’re considering adoption for your child, every situation is different and there’s never a wrong time to reach out and get more information about your options.

A: There is no cost to a birth parent(s) who chooses to make an adoption plan. All costs associated with adoption are covered by the adoptive family, including prenatal and delivery medical expenses. Counseling, agency, and attorney fees are all covered by the adoptive family as part of their total adoption cost. Adoptive families are informed of this when they begin pursuing adoption.

A: There is financial assistance available. Ohio law allows assistance for pregnancy related living expenses. Such expenses may include help with groceries, gas, clothing, rent, and utilities. Living expenses must be distributed by the adoption agency or the attorney arranging the adoption.

A: Yes, ultimately you make the final decision on who is involved and aware of your pregnancy and adoption plan.  We will follow your lead and only discuss the adoption plan with those you approve of. Your wishes to keep information confidential are honored by the professionals working to support you.

A: Although Caring for Kids encourages minors to inform and involve their parents, if you and/or the birth father are under the age of 18 you do not need permission from your parents to create an adoption plan. Birth grandparents do not have parenting rights in Ohio. Regardless of age, in the state of Ohio, birth parents are considered legally capable of making independent decisions concerning their child.

A: No. Our goal is not to convince you to make an adoption plan, but to educate you about your options so you can feel confident making an informed decision for your baby. 

A: You can change your mind at any point while creating an adoption plan, before or after birth, as long as nothing permanent has been signed. After the baby is born, legally you must wait at least 72 hours to sign these permanent legal documents.  Additional time is always available if you need more time to make your decision.

A: It is not too late to make your adoption plan, even if you’ve already delivered. You can call or text us 24/7 at 330-815-4907. We have Birth Parent Counselors around the state who are willing and able to talk with you and meet with you, usually the same day!
It also is not uncommon for us to work with parents considering adoption for a child they’ve been parenting. We have placed children ages newborn up to six years old through our program and are readily available to talk about options for your individual situation!

A: At least 72 hours after the birth of the baby, you can choose to sign your permanent paperwork with Caring for Kids. Once signed, this paperwork is irrevocable and your adoption plan is permanent. You not have to go to court to complete this paperworkwe will meet with you wherever you are comfortable – the hospital, your home, our office, or another neutral location.

Questions about Birth Fathers

A: In most cases he is not required to be involved.  However, in cases where the couple is married or he is in the military, there are additional requirements depending on the circumstances.

A: Birth fathers can have rights in Ohio. The extent of these rights depends on each unique situation. When we have the opportunity to talk, we review the specifics of the circumstances and share appropriate information.

 

Ohio has a Putative Father Registry. The OPFR allows a male to register if he believes he may have fathered a child and wants to be notified if the child is placed for adoption. For more details on the Putative Father Registry for Ohio, visit https://jfs.ohio.gov/pfr/.

A: A birth father can prevent a birth mother from creating an adoption plan in certain circumstances. When we have the opportunity to talk, we review the specifics of the situation and share appropriate information.

 

An adoption can take place with only the relinquishment of a birth mother’s parental rights, as long as the alleged father has not provided emotional or financial support during the pregnancy. Similarly, a birth father can choose to not be involved with the adoption plan, but also not oppose it.

A: No, birth grandparents do not have parental rights in the state of Ohio. The only individuals that must give consent to the adoption are the birth mother and, if involved, the birth father. This stands true even if one, or both, of the expectant parents is a minor. Regardless of age, in the state of Ohio, expectant parents are considered adults and are thus legally capable of making decisions concerning their child.

Questions about Adoptive Families

A: Our adoption professionals talk in depth with birth mothers and fathers to see what they desire in an adoptive family. These values and wishes are then matched to adoptive families who have already been approved by our agency. Each adoptive family creates a picture profile book about their family to share with the birth parent(s). They also write a more in-depth letter, to be shown to the birth parent(s), giving further information and details about their lives and families. After reviewing the books, the birth parent(s) can choose to meet with prospective adoptive families or set up phone interviews to get to know them better. Birth parents can also choose a family from simply looking through the books. If the birth parent(s) would prefer to not be involved with the selection process, the agency can take on the responsibility of choosing the adoptive family.

A: All adoptive families are put through a very rigorous screening process before being approved to adopt through Caring for Kids. Prospective adoptive parents have criminal background checks, medical exams, as well as screenings for a history of child abuse and neglect. They also have their financial situation evaluated and are asked to submit letters of reference written by family, friends, and employers. Before being approved, families also complete a homestudy, conducted by a social worker. This process takes a great deal of time as prospective adoptive families are visited in their home and asked multiple questions about their personal history, their desire to adopt and parent, their support system, as well as all of the elements mentioned above. Their homestudy is then approved by Caring for Kids and submitted to the state for additional approval before any children can be placed in their home.

A: It is up to the birth parent to decide if they want to meet the adoptive family – they are never obligated or forced to do so. If a birth parent chooses not to meet the adoptive family, they can always change their mind later. There is no time frame in which the birth parent must meet an adoptive family. Birth parents should keep in mind that in most cases the adoptive family would like to meet!

Questions about Ongoing Contact

A: Yes, expectant parents who are interested in seeing their child or knowing about them as they grow up can have an open adoption. Openness in adoption is considered to be a continuum. Ultimately, the birth parent decides what level of openness they desire.

 

In an open adoption, birth parents can choose to see the child for visits or simply exchange information with the adoptive family before the birth. Anything in between these two ends of the spectrum can also be considered. Birth parents interested in some level of openness are matched with families who are willing to consider a similar level of openness.

Birth parents also have the option of a closed adoption. A closed adoption means that no identifying information is exchanged between the birth and adoptive families before or after the birth of the child.

A: Yes, research shows that sharing an adoption story is important. Adoptive parents that have attended training through Caring for Kids are educated on the importance of sharing the child’s adoption story starting from the day the child goes home with them. The reality is, an adoptive parent can only share as much information as a birth parent provides.

A: In the state of Ohio, an openness agreement between birth and adoptive families is not legally binding. It is possible that the level of openness agreed upon by the birth and adoptive families will not be maintained by one or both parties. Adoptive families are given an abundance of information on the benefits of an open adoption and, in our experience, do maintain the agreed upon level of openness. In the event that an adoptive family does not continue with the agreed upon level of openness, our agency will help mediate the situation with all parties involved.

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